456 Notes

Danai Gurira poses for a portrait at the Getty Images Portrait Studio powered by Samsung Galaxy at Comic-Con International 2014 

1316 Notes

missjia:

I’m so freaking sick of cancer. If you’re a frequent viewer of natural hair videos on YouTube, I’m certain you’re familiar with the dynamic duo @msvaughntv and her sister, @meechymonroe. Meechy was recently diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer & the family has created the #getwellmeechy campaign in hopes of helping with some of the expenses. I have placed the link in my bio for easy access but if you have anything to spare and believe in the power of prayer, please send one up for this family so that Meechy can recover with ease. Additional deets via @strawberricurls IG (REBLOG this you guys; lets do our part and show some LOVE): REPOST FROM @strawberricurls: Meechy’s momentum was cut short on May 31, 2014 when she was diagnosed with a rare sarcoma (or vascular cancerous tumor) in her brain. The tumor caused Meechy to suffer multiple mild strokes, which have led to certain physical and speech challenges including an Aphasia diagnosis (a disturbance of the delivery of language – not at all linked to a loss of intelligence). On May 30th 2014, Meechy underwent her first of two brain surgeries. It was this craniotomy which actually revealed the tumor. In preparation for the procedure, rather than lose her hair, she had it carefully shaved, preserved and donated to Locks of Love—a not-for-profit organization which focuses on Cancer patients coping with hair loss. < amazing to be so giving in her own time of need! Prayers up! #getwellmeechy https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/x155/-getwellmeechy-medical-expense-fund

missjia:

I’m so freaking sick of cancer. If you’re a frequent viewer of natural hair videos on YouTube, I’m certain you’re familiar with the dynamic duo @msvaughntv and her sister, @meechymonroe. Meechy was recently diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer & the family has created the #getwellmeechy campaign in hopes of helping with some of the expenses. I have placed the link in my bio for easy access but if you have anything to spare and believe in the power of prayer, please send one up for this family so that Meechy can recover with ease. Additional deets via @strawberricurls IG (REBLOG this you guys; lets do our part and show some LOVE): REPOST FROM @strawberricurls: Meechy’s momentum was cut short on May 31, 2014 when she was diagnosed with a rare sarcoma (or vascular cancerous tumor) in her brain. The tumor caused Meechy to suffer multiple mild strokes, which have led to certain physical and speech challenges including an Aphasia diagnosis (a disturbance of the delivery of language – not at all linked to a loss of intelligence). On May 30th 2014, Meechy underwent her first of two brain surgeries. It was this craniotomy which actually revealed the tumor. In preparation for the procedure, rather than lose her hair, she had it carefully shaved, preserved and donated to Locks of Love—a not-for-profit organization which focuses on Cancer patients coping with hair loss. < amazing to be so giving in her own time of need! Prayers up! #getwellmeechy https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/x155/-getwellmeechy-medical-expense-fund

124 Notes

hellyeahmichonne:

Danai Gurira

hellyeahmichonne:

Danai Gurira

Notes

Black star, white ceiling: Why can’t Lupita Nyong’o find a role worthy of her? | EW.com

An Academy Award can mean many things, but it’s never the solution to a problem. That reminder landed brutally in late April, when Lupita Nyong’o, the actress whose Oscar for 12 Years a Slave was the Cinderella story of this year’s ceremony, entered final talks for her first major post-prize gig. She’ll be playing the mother wolf in a remake of The Jungle Book.

You read that right. Hollywood is handed a beautiful, talented, Yale School of Drama-trained actress of color, and what does it come up with? Well, let’s see…she could be an animal. In the Third World.

Click here for more.

Notes

We regret to inform you that you've been cooking quinoa incorrectly

This changes EVERYTHING!!

22672 Notes

celestedoodles:

lupita nyong’o - academy awards 2014 

celestedoodles:

lupita nyong’o - academy awards 2014 

7348 Notes

humansofnewyork:

"With all the good it’s brought, technology is destroying our communication skills— especially the ability to listen. The older generation can still listen, but many of the youngsters can’t even look you in the eye while you speak. If they aren’t looking at their mobiles, they’re looking over your shoulder or glancing around the room.""Why is verbal communication more important than communication through a device?""Because there’s only so much you can learn from your Facebook friends."

She&#8217;s right. It&#8217;s a terrible habit that I&#8217;m trying to break.

humansofnewyork:

"With all the good it’s brought, technology is destroying our communication skills— especially the ability to listen. The older generation can still listen, but many of the youngsters can’t even look you in the eye while you speak. If they aren’t looking at their mobiles, they’re looking over your shoulder or glancing around the room."
"Why is verbal communication more important than communication through a device?"
"Because there’s only so much you can learn from your Facebook friends."

She’s right. It’s a terrible habit that I’m trying to break.

Notes

The Incoherent Backlashes to Black Actors Playing 'White' Superheroes

"Fans often seem to believe that if a character is changed from white to black, they will no longer be able to identify with that superhero."

26 Notes

CNN talks to Danai Gurira about the return of The Walking Dead

hellyeahmichonne:

(CNN) — She had the most memorable entrance of any character on “The Walking Dead” so far.

Just as Andrea was about to be set upon by a herd of walkers, a shadowy figure dispatched them — with a Katana sword. It was one of the standout moments of the season two finale, and we would soon learn that this person’s name was Michonne, a quiet warrior who had seemingly mastered how to survive in the zombie apocalypse (one bright idea: bring along a couple of chained walkers with no hands or mouths to draw away the others).

Ever since that moment, Michonne, played by Danai Gurira, has been rivaled only by Daryl Dixon in terms of rabid fans. At times, she is a silent force of nature, but has opened up a good deal to the rest of the survivors lately.

The season’s midway point having ended with (spoiler alert!) a brutal attack on the prison, sending the group off in different directions, not to mention the horrifying death of Hershel. CNN spoke with Gurira about what fans can expect when the season returns on Sunday.

Read more..

3 Notes

From NPR:

Noah Cho, who is half Korean and half white, reflects on looking into the mirror.


How I learned to feel undesirable
Noah Cho:

When I look in the mirror, I do not see someone that I understand to be handsome by Western standards. I look mostly Asian, and like so many other heterosexual Asian males before me, I have internalized a lifetime of believing that my features, my face, my skin tone, in tandem, make me unattractive and undesirable.



It is not a fun thing to feel unattractive. My wife, who is Japanese and Chinese and has been my partner for 10 years, tells me that she finds me attractive. It breaks her heart that I won&#8217;t believe her. It breaks mine that I can&#8217;t.

Read more&#8230;

From NPR:

Noah Cho, who is half Korean and half white, reflects on looking into the mirror.

How I learned to feel undesirable

Noah Cho:

When I look in the mirror, I do not see someone that I understand to be handsome by Western standards. I look mostly Asian, and like so many other heterosexual Asian males before me, I have internalized a lifetime of believing that my features, my face, my skin tone, in tandem, make me unattractive and undesirable.

It is not a fun thing to feel unattractive. My wife, who is Japanese and Chinese and has been my partner for 10 years, tells me that she finds me attractive. It breaks her heart that I won’t believe her. It breaks mine that I can’t.

Read more…

Notes

Watch: The Racist War on Drugs

Transcript — If you ask the question why are some drugs legal and others illegal. Why are cigarettes and alcohol legal and pharmaceuticals in the middle and these other drugs — marijuana and, you know, other ones illegal? You know, some people sort of inherently assume well this must be because there was a thoughtful consideration of the relative risks of drugs and, you know — but then that can’t be because we know alcohol is more associated with violence than almost any illegal drugs. And cigarettes are more addictive than any of the illegal drugs. I mean, heroin addicts routinely say it’s harder to quit cigarettes than it is to quit heroin. 

So, it’s not as if there was ever any kind of National Academy of Science that a hundred years ago decided that these drugs — these ones had to be illegal and those ones legal. And it’s not as if this is in the Bible or in the Code of Hammurabi. I mean, nobody was making legal distinctions among many of these drugs back in — until the twentieth century essentially.

So if you ask how and why this distinction got made, what you realize when you look at the history is it has almost nothing to do with the relative risks of these drugs and almost everything to do with who used and who was perceived to use these drugs, right. So there’s — you know, back in the 1870s when the majority of opiate consumers were middle aged white women, you know — throughout the country using them for their aches and pains and for their, you know, the time of the month and menopause and there was no aspirin. There was no penicillin. You know, lots of diarrhea because of bad sanitation and nothing stops you up like opiates. I mean, millions — many more — a much higher percentage of the population back then used opiates than now.

But nobody thought about criminalizing it because nobody wanted to put, you know, auntie or grandma behind bars, right. But then when the Chinese started coming to the country in large numbers in the 1870s and 80s and, you know, working on the railroads and working in the mines and working in factories and, you know — and then going back home at the end of the night to smoke up a little opium the way they did in the old country. The same way White people were having a couple of whiskeys in the evening. 

And that’s when you got the first opium prohibition laws. In Nevada, in California in the 1870s and 80s directed at the Chinese minorities. It was all about the fear — what would those Chinamen with their opium do to our precious women. You know, addicting them and seducing them and turning them into sex slaves and all this sort of stuff.

The first anti-cocaine laws were in the South in the early part of the twentieth century directed at black men working on the docks and the fear. You know, what would happen to those black men when they took that white powder up their black noses and forgot their proper place in society. You know, going out — the first time anybody ever said that, you know, the cops needed a 38 would not bring down a Negro crazed on cocaine. You needed a 45. 

I mean, the New York Times, the paper of record, reporting this stuff as fact back in those days. That’s when you got the first cocaine prohibition laws. The first marijuana prohibition laws were in the Midwest and the Southwest directed at Mexican migrants, Mexican Americans taking the good jobs from the good white people. Going back home to their communities, smoking a little of that funny smoking, you know, marijuana, reefer cigarette. And once again the fear, what would this minority do to our precious women and children.

So, I mean, it’s always been about that. I mean even alcohol prohibition was to some extent a broader conflict between the white white Americans and the not so white white Americans, right. The white white Americans coming from northern and western Europe in the eighteenth, early nineteenth century with all of their stuff. And then the not so white white Americans coming from southern Europe and eastern Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century bringing with them their beer and their vino and, you know, their schlivowitz, right. I mean, it was all about that type of conflict. 

You, sir, deserve the slow clap.

1 Notes

On Beyonce’s feminism…

The cynic in me says that this is less about feminism and more about marketing.

Her so called “manifesto" reads more like a press release.

I’ve got to hand it to the team that promotes and manages Beyonce. They are marketing geniuses.

I wonder what she’ll be for her next album?

Don’t mind me. I’m bored becuase I’m the only person in my social circle not watching the Super Bowl.

10329 Notes

humansofnewyork:

"Facebook is telling me that everyone has a house, a kid, and a dog. So I’m just trying to calm the fuck down."

humansofnewyork:

"Facebook is telling me that everyone has a house, a kid, and a dog. So I’m just trying to calm the fuck down."

6 Notes

64bitwar:

Just a reminder. You’re not obligated to label your views or identify with a group to have them. Humans are tribal animals and we love to be in a group and fight for a team so if you have to have a team, make it team people, not team men or team women or team straight or team gay, just team human.

We’re all in this together. Some of you make that an unfortunate thing.